January 31, 1863

January the 31th 1863

Well boys,

I received yours and Sarahs letter yesterday eavning. I was very glad to hear from you and to hear that you was well and I hope when this comes to hand it will finde you well as I am happy to say that I am well. Well Talor Jon said Lisey was on Sarahs lap scuking hir title. I wish I was thare to crook my finger at hir but I am a fraid it will be a good while before I shall be able to enjoy that pleasure. Well Scotte you wanted to know how I felt in the fite. Well I wasn’t in the wermest place but I was with the battry at one time when their was several rebble canon firing at us and 6 guns of a nother one of our baterys that lay to the rite of us firing nearly rite over us. The air was full of led and the ground appeared to sway back and forth. I will draw a little scech of our position at that time. If I ever live to get hom I will tell you all about it but you wanted to know how I fellt. Well I fellt like I would as leave and be at home playing with the baby. turn over

Scotty you said you would like to be hear and you said you would be if you was old anuf. I am glad that you ain’t old anuf for I don’t want any body els that is any kin to me to come to war for therr is but very few but what would be very glad to get out of this scrape if they could and you hear men sware every day that they will not stay much longer and I can’t blame them much. All that ceeps the army together is the love of friends not of country at this time. This is Sunday but if you wasn’t to ceep account of the days you would not know when Sunday came. Hear there is no regard hade to the sabbath hear. I am not surprised at the faliers {followers?} of the army when I see the wickedness there is in it. But I will have to close for this time hoping to remain your loving brother until deth.

Wm Forder to G & S Hubbard and all the rest of the friends

Rite soon and often and tell all the rest of the friends to rite. Hug my little girl for me.

Note:  Here William is writing to his brother-in-law Scott Hubbard. 

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January 30, 1963

January the 30th 1863

Dear Wife and Friends

I take the preasant opportunity to rite a few lines to you in answer to your cinde letters that came to hande yesterday. I was glad to hear from you and to hear that you and our little girl is all and all the rest of the friends ware well. It came threw in a hurry. It was mailed on the 24th and I got it on the 29th. I had thought I would not rite for a day or to but as you sent the material for a letter, I thought I would fill it out while I had a chance for the chat is that we are going to leave hear before long but I don’t know whare we will go to.

The wether had ben a little cold for a few days but it is clear and pleasant to day. I received 2 letters this morning. 1 from Uncle Billey and Albert and one from Ira Hiatt. Uncle Billey said they was all well and that times was prety good. He said money was plenty and Ira said his paw had made a greate trade. He has trade old lock for a 6 shooter and a shot gun. That looks war like don’t it but I ken he ain’t dangerous. I rote to him the other day and told him I wanted him to pay my sate with the money he got for that hay and told him the reason I had not rote to him before was that I did not feald very well toward him since I know of that mistreatment of riting he got up for you to sign. I also told him I intended for him to pay himself out of the corn for his trubble but I thought I had try rather deep. I expect he will rare up behind but I don’t care of he does.

I will now say that I am well and all the rest of the boys. Jim Mc got a letter from home this morning and he got a pare of socks but he don’t know who sent them tho postage on them was 9 cents. I also got a letter from Melaine this morning. She said she had got a letter from you. You had aught to se what she said about me to hear hir tell it I am one of the best men in the world wich is a grand mistake. I only wish I was as good as I should be for I know that I am a pore unworthy crecher of the dust.
I will now close by saying I want you to rite as often as you can. I know it is a hard trile for you for you have nothing to draw your attention like I have but I hope the war will soon be over so that we can all come home. So fare well for this time. From your loving husband
William Forder to his loving wife Sarah Forder

___________________________________________

Dear Father and Mother and Brothers and Sisters,

I will name your names if I can’t doo any meare just to let you know that I haven’t forgotten you. I often think of you and hope it will not belong untill I can come home and have a good time with you. Give my respects to all the friends and except the same from your loving sun and brother

Wm Forder to G & C Hubbard

Don’t forget to rite so fare well. Rite rite rite

 

NoteIra Hiatt was the son of Silas Hiatt, born 1850, died 1915. 

Albert undoubtedly refers to his brother, Albert Forder.  He was born in 1842 and enlisted in Company D, Indiana 38th Infantry on September 18th, 1861 at the age of 18.  He died of Typhoid Fever on April 1, 1862.

At this time we are unsure as to who Uncle Billy or Melaine are.

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Indiana 10th Inventory

An Artillery Battery is a unit that specializes in heavy fire power weapons.  Modern day artillery units carry rockets, mortars, and missiles.  However, during the time of the civil war, this generally meant one thing.

Cannons. 

And variations thereof.

Historically a “Battery” consisted of a group of cannons, howitzers, and mortars coordinating fire.  The Cannons and Howitzers are defined by the weight of the ordinance it can hurl.  Therefore, a 10lb cannon can fire a 10lb cannon ball.  According to www.civilwarhome.com, the term “Light Artillery” indicated that the cannoniers were mounted and therefore could move faster than their unmounted counterparts.  The guns were typically lower in weight in order to aid in their mobility. 

Another civil war blog, To the Sound of the Guns, lists ordinance records and inventory from various Indiana Batteries including the 10th.  According to these inventories, the unit carried two 12pd field howitzers and four 10pd Parrotts.  For those who are interested, To the Sound of the Guns also lists inventories of related equipment gleaned at various points from the units. 

Image of a 10lb Parrott

Image of a 12 lb Howitzer

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